Who We Are

About Us

Our Mission

Anchored to the successful delivery of The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, The Wellbeing Foundation Africa strives to educate, empower, and advocate for accessible and sustainable health in Africa


Our Purpose

Through a multi-layered strategy of research, advocacy, policy development, community engagement, philanthropy and education, The Wellbeing Foundation Africa devises and implements programs.


Letter from

H.E Toyin OjoraSaraki

Founder-President, The Wellbeing Foundation

In 2004, I realised that the silence on the inadequate maternal health system in Nigeria and Africa could not continue, and it had to change. This is when I founded The Wellbeing Foundation Africa. It was actually my own traumatic experience in my home country Nigeria, where I lost my own child; which made me fully aware of the challenges and deficits every mother was experiencing, every day, every birth – be it unsanitised and old equipment to cold and unwelcoming health workers. 

I had always understood that many Nigerians suffered from lack of education and opportunity, but this inequality was most pronounced in childbirth. Every aspect of the process – from medical staff access to availability of resources to even basic cleanliness – is impacted upon by regional and national standards. The trauma of losing a child opened my eyes to how few options were available for Nigerians. For all to learn, to be vocationally skilled and to be employed. All of this is dependent on various social factors, including class, geography, and gender. Women and girls unequivocally face the greatest challenges and barriers to education, work and rights in Nigeria and across Africa.

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MamaCare

Mamacare Antenatal Education

All pregnant women are welcome to attend The Wellbeing Foundation MamaCare Antenatal Education classes. Classes are led by a qualified midwife, held weekly. Partners and family members are welcome. The sessions will give pregnant women practical information, advice and support to help prepare for birth and care for their newborn.

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Why Give:

H.E Toyin Ojora Saraki, Founder and President of the Wellbeing Foundation Africa

My video
Who We Are

Meet Our Team

H.E. Toyin Ojora Saraki
Founder and President

As Founder of The Wellbeing Foundation Africa, H.E., Mrs Toyin Saraki is a Nigerian leader & advocate for women’s & children’s health.

Amy Oyekunle
CEO

Amy Oyekunle is gender and development professional with experience in gender research, resource mobilization and donor relationship.

Dr Luther-King Fasehun
Country Director

Dr Luther-King Fasehun is a qualified medical doctor, with expertise in healthcare management, health economics, and policy development.

Sustainable

Development Goals


Good Health and Wellbeing

Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages


Gender Equality

Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls


Clean Water and Sanitation

Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all

What We Do

Our Programs


#MAMACARE

All pregnant women are welcome to attend The Wellbeing Foundation MamaCare Antenatal Education classes. Classes are led by a qualified midwife, held weekly. Partners and family members are welcome.

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EMONC

Emergency Obstetric and Newborn Care(EMONC). Obstetric emergencies are unpredictable and sudden. Successful management requires a rapid coordinated response by often ad hoc multi professional teams.

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Latest News

From The Blog



H.E. Mrs Toyin Saraki To Deliver Opening Address At 8th Africa Conference On Sexual Health and Rights, South Africa


The Founder of the Wellbeing Foundation Africa, Her Excellency Mrs Toyin Saraki, is to deliver the opening address at the 8th Africa Conference on Sexual Health and Rights, Johannesburg, South Africa, 14th February, 2018.



Philanthropist Toyin Saraki on her mission to end maternal mortality


Toyin Saraki never saw her baby who died. At first, when she asked to see the second of her twin girls, Saraki was told she’d been taken to another hospital. Even now — 25 years on — she doesn’t know where the baby is buried.